Meet Sherry Johnston from The Biggest Loser, Season 9

Join us for our special holiday event on Monday, December 3, 2012, and meet Sherry Johnston from The Biggest Loser, Season 9. When Sherry and her daughter Ashley arrived at The Biggest Loser’s Ranch, they already knew they had sleep apnea. They just hadn't been able to treat it. At 5'1," Sherry weighed in at 218 pounds.  

In a National Sleep Foundation article, Sherry said one of the best parts of being a contestant on The Biggest Loser was receiving free, brand new CPAPs for her and Ashley. "[It] was one of the greatest gifts I, or Ashley, have been given...it was the first really good night's sleep I'd had in a long time.” She went on to say she didn't realize how important CPAP was, and how she was putting her life in jeopardy by not using it. Of the 22 contestants that season, 20 of them had sleep apnea.  

Sherry has lost 99 pounds, and is now the same size she was on her wedding day (105 pounds). She and Ashley are still using their CPAPs and are doing well.  

Do you or someone you know suffer from sleep problems? If so, you are encouraged to attend this support group meeting on Monday, December 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Parrish Healthcare Center at Port St. John, 5005 Port St. John Parkway (east of the I-95 Port St. John exit). Meetings are held in the Conference Center by the south entrance (near the sleep lab). This is a free community service. Please call 321-268-6408 to register.  

Join us and hear Sherry’s inspiring story. Then enjoy the Holiday Sleep Style Show as “models” wear newer CPAP machines. Refreshments and door prizes will also be available.  

If you’ve struggled with using your CPAP machine, don’t wait to get help. It could be a matter of life or death. The care partners at the Parrish Sleep Disorders Center can help you. Free sleep evaluations are done by a registered technologist at every meeting. One of the most common signs of obstructive sleep apnea is loud and chronic (ongoing) snoring. Sleep apnea can result in depression, diabetes and morning headaches. Sleep apnea also contributes to high blood pressure, which an estimated 50 percent of sleep apnea patients have. The greatest risk from this sleep disorder, however, is stroke or heart attack. Everyone (you, someone you know or anyone with a sleep partner) who suffers from the sleep apnea warning signs mentioned above should take these symptoms seriously.
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